An Apollo 9 Anniversary

On this day in 1969, Commander Jim McDivitt, Command Module Pilot David Scott, and Lunar Module Pilot Rusty Schweickart blasted off from Kennedy Space Center for the 10-day Apollo 9 mission. Apollo 9 was the third manned-mission of the Apollo Program and tested many components critical for lunar landing that would occur two missions later with Apollo 11.

Just over four decades later and on the anniversary of its lift-off from Earth, I happen to find myself in San Diego, California where the Apollo 9 Command Module (nicknamed “Gumdrop” by its crew) is displayed at the San Diego Air and Space Museum. I was thrilled to take my family to pay tribute to such an important part of the world’s space program.

The first thing that jumps out at you when seeing an Apollo Command Module for the first time is its size; specifically, how small it is, considering three grown men spent most of their mission living in it.

Apollo 9 Command Module "Gumdrop" and Me

"Gumdrop" and yours truly.

But things really seem small when you take a look inside:

Interior of Apollo 9 Command Module "Gumdrop"

Interior view of "Gumdrop"

The interior offers what appears to be even less room than you have flying coach on a commercial airliner. My legs start to feel cramped after just looking at this picture, so I can only imagine what it must have felt like to spend days in there. I’m guessing that when NASA was recruiting its astronauts, claustrophobia was a disqualifier.

View of some of Gumdrop's controls

Detail of just a few of the seemingly-infinite number of switches and controls.

I spent a lot of time observing the intricate details on the exterior of the capsule as well. The capsule looks exactly how you’d expect, for something that had to withstand temperatures of a couple of hundred degrees below zero (F) on the low end, all the way up to 5,000-degrees (F) on the high end. And that’s to say nothing about the other forces involved in launch, orbit, and reentry.

Detail of "Gumdrop's" Roll Engines

Detail of "Gumdrop's" Roll Engines

The capsule’s heat shield was made of an ablative material — meaning it “turns white hot, chars, and then melts away” during reentry. Amazingly, this heat shield was only two inches at its thickest point, and a mere half inch in some spots! It must have provided quite a light-show for anyone watching the intimidating, yet intended, fiery break-away of the heat shield.

Exterior detail of "Gumdrop"

Exterior detail of "Gumdrop".

To top off the exhibit, there were many other displays related to, not only Apollo 9, but other NASA manned spaceflight programs as well, which I’ll save for another time.

My only gripes about the display were that I wished there were more items and information (though, I could probably never be satisfied in this regard) and more thought put into the ambiance of the displays (for example, rather than controlled lighting, many of the exhibits were lit by very large windows which created a lot of glare that was difficult to see through on some of the displays). Also, I was sort of hoping there would have been some sort of special recognition of today being Apollo 9’s lift-off anniversary since that mission is the focus of one of their major exhibits; but now I’m just being picky.

All said and done, spending a few hours up close and personal with Gumdrop and the associated displays was a wonderful way to celebrate the anniversary of the lift-off of Apollo 9.

Apollo 9 Mission Insignia

Apollo 9 Mission Insignia


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