ATREX – Observing the Air Up There

I suspect we might hear about strange sky phenomena and UFOs occurring over the US Eastern Seaboard tomorrow, thanks to NASA’s ATREX mission.
After previously being scrubbed, the next launch attempt has been set for the wee hours (2am – 5am EST, or what I might consider late tonight) of March 27. ATREX, or the Anomalous Transport Rocket Experiment, is designed to study ultra-high altitude, high-speed wind patterns that have been observed on the very edge of space1. Data suggests that 200 – 300 mile-per-hour winds occur at an altitude of 62 – 68 miles; though little is yet understood about the phenomena. The atmosphere at that height is incredibly thin, and it essentially takes a rocket to get there.

The project will complete its test with the use of five of what are referred to as sounding rockets, launched within minutes of each other. These sounding rockets are smaller than those that are used to achieve orbit or carry heavier payloads, but will work just fine for this experiment. After reaching an altitude of 50 miles, the rockets will release a chemical tracer that will be observed from camera facilities both North (New Jersey) and South (North Carolina) of the Wollops Flight Facility in Virginia. The chemical, trimethylaluminium, was selected due to its reaction to oxygen; it glows and produces aluminium dioxide, carbon dioxide, and water vapor (each already present in our atmosphere).

Diagram of ATREX mission
(Graphic showing various aspects of the ATREX mission. Click for larger version.)
[Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center]

If you’re not on the US East Coast, but still want to try and watch the show, NASA has a webcast available here: http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/webcast/ and a UStream will carry it here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-wallops

For more information, you can follow the Wollops Flight Facility on Twitter, and check out the video below.


  1. For an important point of clarification, when I use the term “edge of space”, I mean it literally. You will often hear about an amateur balloon going to space, or a sky-dive from or near space, but those are exaggerations in my opinion. In my book, we’re talking at least 50 miles (the point at which NASA gives you astronaut wings) or better yet, the Kármán line.
Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply