Cassini Week: Goodbye Cassini

On September 15, 2017, Cassini’s extraordinary, decades-long mission ended. The discovery machine sent back its final transmissions before vaporizing within Saturn’s atmosphere. Its atoms now a part of the planet that it put into such sharp focus for us. It marked the end of an era.

The past week has been bittersweet. I’ve spent many hours remembering and sharing some of my favorite Cassini images. I’ve only posted a small fraction of my favorites, and every time I hit the publish button I’d remember another image that I wish I had included. I could devote this entire blog to sharing images and discoveries that we owe to Cassini and never run out of content. The robot was truly remarkable.

I’ve saved my favorite image for today’s post, as I wrap up Cassini Week.

The ringed beauty, Saturn.

The ringed beauty, Saturn – Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

This image blew me away the first time I saw it. It’s an image seared into my mind and one I’ll never forget. But there’s more to it than just what you see at first glance. There’s a deeper meaning to be uncovered upon closer inspection.

Look closer at the image above. Click on it; look at it in full screen. On the left side, between Saturn’s brighter main rings and the G ring is a pale blue dot. It’s the same pale blue dot that Carl Sagan waxed poetically about nearly 30 years ago, when we first saw our home planet from a similar perspective.

“That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.

The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there…

There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world.”

Sagan’s words have never rang more true.

Cassini, along with all of the other instruments of science, do more than just teach us about the subjects of their attention. They teach us about ourselves. They put our infinitesimally small corner of the Universe in perspective. Cassini showed us worlds we could have hardly imagined. Each discovery making the Universe a little larger, a little more dynamic.

For some, that might make you feel small. Personally, I don’t think that’s a bad thing. It puts our more minor inconveniences and frustrations in perspective. It’s a reminder of how far we’ve come as a species, how fortunate we are to live our lives at such an exciting time.

And, it gives us the tiniest glimpse of the potential of our future.

 

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