Cassini’s Grand Finale

On September 15, one of the most fruitful space missions ever imagined will come to an end. After two decades in space, Cassini’s fuel supplies are close to being depleted. To avoid contaminating one of Saturn’s moons, including a pair that could harbor life–Enceladus and Titan–the decision was made to retire Cassini into Saturn’s atmosphere. Up until contact between the orbiter and Earth is lost, Cassini will continue to study our beloved ringed planet. New insight will be gleaned from this mission that’s only made possible by Cassini’s fatal approach to the gas giant. Among the data to be collected:

  • The spacecraft will make detailed maps of Saturn’s gravity and magnetic fields, revealing how the planet is arranged internally, and possibly helping to solve the irksome mystery of just how fast Saturn is rotating.
  • The final dives will vastly improve our knowledge of how much material is in the rings, bringing us closer to understanding their origins.
  • Cassini’s particle detectors will sample icy ring particles being funneled into the atmosphere by Saturn’s magnetic field.
  • Its cameras will take amazing, ultra-close images of Saturn’s rings and clouds.

Cassini launched on Oct. 15, 1997. After a seven-year journey the orbiter arrived at Saturn, carrying the European Space Agency’s Huygens probe. In 2005, the probe successfully landed on Saturn’s largest moon, Titan.


Quick facts about Titan:

  • Titan is the solar system’s second largest moon.
  • It’s the only moon in our solar system that has cloud systems and a dense, planet-like atmosphere.
  • Titan has liquid hydrocarbon lakes, mountains, and seasonal weather patterns.

For 13 years, Cassini has orbited Saturn and provided us with fascinating information about, not just the planet, but its intricate ring system and many moons.

Cassini mission overview infographic

Cassini mission overview infographic – Click for larger version – Source: NASA/JPL

In addition to the important scientific data that was collected by Cassini, are the breathtaking images that have been collected: storms and aurorae on Saturn, detailed views of the worlds that are Saturn moons, and remarkable visions of Saturn’s sensational rings.

For the next week, we celebrate Cassini’s achievements.

Still from the short film Cassini's Grand Finale, the spacecraft is shown diving between Saturn and the planet's innermost ring.

Still from the short film Cassini’s Grand Finale, the spacecraft is shown diving between Saturn and the planet’s innermost ring. – Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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