Yesterday Was A Big Day For SpaceX

Yesterday was a big day for Elon Musk and his space launch services company SpaceX. On April 9, 2016, SpaceX launched its Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral. The rocket was topped with the company’s Dragon capsule, filled with 7,000 pounds of supplies destined for the International Space Station. Included in the payload was the 3,100 pound Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), Bigelow Aerospace’s attempt to demonstrate its expandable space habitats.

SpaceX CRS-8 Mission Patch

SpaceX CRS-8 Mission Patch – Source: SpaceX

The highlight of the mission, designated CRS-8, was SpaceX’s first successful landing of its Falcon 9 rocket on a droneship (christened “Of Course I Still Love You”) in the Atlantic Ocean. This feat is something SpaceX had tried and failed four times previously. SpaceX has successfully landed its Falcon 9 on land, but that challenge paled in comparison to a landing on a barge being tossed around by Atlantic currents.

SpaceX has put a huge emphasis on making its programs efficient and reusable. Their hope is that their methods will drive down the costs of putting people and equipment into orbit and beyond, and make launches much more common. Friday’s successful landing of the Falcon 9 was a huge step in that direction.

All in all, Friday’s success should serve as an important milestone in space exploration. It also highlights the ever increasing transfer of space access from governments to commercial industries.

Check out the amazing video below, of the Falcon 9 landing on ‘Of Course I Still Love You’.

Unreal.

Dragon will arrive at the ISS tomorrow, April 10.

Book Review: Packing For Mars by Mary Roach

Packing For Mars cover

  • Title: Packing For Mars
  • Author: Mary Roach
  • Printed Pages: 334
  • Publish Year: August 2nd 2010 (W. W. Norton & Company)
  • Recommended For: People that want all of the dirty details about spaceflight that NASA tends not to advertise, those that enjoy Mary Roach’s humor and wit, and anyone who wants to find out just how ‘wrong’ some of that ‘Right Stuff’ was.

First Lines: “To the rocket scientist, you are a problem. You are the most irritating piece of machinery he or she will ever have to deal with. You and your fluctuation metabolism, your puny memory, your frame that comes in a million different configurations.”

Review:

I’ve read this book twice now. I read it when it was released in 2010.  I wasn’t familiar with Mary Roach at the time, but I was particularly interested in the history of spaceflight at the time. While waiting to board a few-hour flight, I saw this book in one of the airport book shops. I read the cover and knew I had to read it on the flight. My new Kindle was a novelty to me at the time, so I decided I would purchase the electronic version to read on the plane. I ran into snags trying to get my Kindle to connect to the airport’s WiFi. While in line to board, I figured out a way to turn my smartphone into a hotspot, connect the Kindle to that connection, and then download the book. It was a close call, but ultimately I had my book.

Packing For Mars kept me entertained for the entire 3-hour flight. My fellow aisle mates had to have been curious about what I thought was so funny because I couldn’t help cracking up at Roach’s witty humor. Before I knew it, the captain was already announcing that we’d be landing soon.

Then, I read it again in 2016 in a cabin in the woods, in Alaska, in the winter. I enjoyed the book even more the second time and picked up on things that I didn’t catch the first time. My knowledge of the US space program is much greater than it was the first time I read this book, and this helped me make mental connections that weren’t apparent the first time. In a sense, I’m saying that this is a book that grows with you.

Mary Roach covers nearly everything in her book. She highlights just how unusual an environment outer space is to the human body. This book reveals nearly everything you could imagine. Serious critical attention is spent on how one goes to the bathroom in space, how sex would work (speculating on whether some might already know the answer to this), how you eat, how you sleep, the risks, the rewards, and the awkwardness.

Roach takes our hero astronauts and cosmonauts and reveals a side of them that’s often overlooked: the fact that they don’t have superpowers, they’re people just like you and me.

One thing I couldn’t help but laughing at after reading this book is that one of the differences between me and an astronaut is that I wear diapers way less than they do!

I’m going to avoid trying to list everything the book covers, and instead I just want to encourage you to check it out for yourself. You don’t even have to be a space-nerd like myself to appreciate this book; it will entertain virtually anyone.

Selected Lines:

As when astronaut Mike Mullane was asked by a NASA psychiatrist what epitaph he’d like to have on his gravestone. Mullane answered, “A loving husband and devoted father,” though in reality, he jokes in Riding Rockets, “I would have sold my wife and children into slavery for a ride into space.”


Among the 106 items left on the moon’s surface by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin are four urine collection assemblies—two large and two small. Who wore which remains a matter of conjecture.


If it’s cordless, fireproof, lightweight and strong, miniaturized, or automated, chances are good NASA has had a hand in the technology. We are talking trash compactors, bulletproof vests, high-speed wireless data transfer, implantable heart monitors, cordless power tools, artificial limbs, dustbusters, sports bras, solar panels, invisible braces, computerized insulin pumps, fire-fighters’ masks.


 

 

My Rating: I have no problem giving this book a 5/5, for making me laugh through turbulence on an airplane, for satisfying some of my greatest curiosities about space, and for making me see my space heroes in a new light: still as amazing as they were when I was a kid, but now with a greater sense of kinship.

You can snag a copy of the book via the link below, and I really hope you will.

ExoMars: Meet ESA's Next Robotic Mars Explorer

Artist's impression depicting the separation of the ExoMars 2016 entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, named Schiaparelli, from the Trace Gas Orbiter, and heading for Mars.

Artist’s impression depicting the separation of the ExoMars 2016 entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, named Schiaparelli, from the Trace Gas Orbiter, and heading for Mars. – Source: ESA/ATG medialab

On Monday, March 14, 2016, the European Space Agency’s (ESA) robotic explorer, ExoMars, is slated to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Seven months later, ExoMars will arrive at the red planet and begin a number of scientific investigations that were designed to help determine whether live ever existed on Mars.

ExoMars Programme

ESA is establishing ExoMars as a two-part program (they spell it programme). The first is the part that’s launching in a few days: an orbiter with an entry, descent, and landing module. The second component is scheduled for a 2018 launch and will include a rover. Roscosmos, the Russian space agency, is a partner with the ESA for the entire program.

The goal of the program is to “demonstrate a number of essential flight and in-situ enabling technologies that are necessary for future exploration missions, such as an international Mars Sample Return mission” and to operate “a number of important scientific investigations”. The latter investigations are designed to search for both past and present life on Mars, understand how the water and geochemical environment varies across the planet, and sample Mars’s atmosphere.

This year’s mission includes an orbiter that will sample trace gases, as well as a landing module that study the environment at its landing site (it will be stationary once it lands). The lander even has a name: Schiaparelli. The name comes from the 17th century Italian astronomer Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli.

Part of the entire program are a number of assessment tools to evaluate the performance of the various components of the mission, to aid in the design of future missions.

The planned 2018 mission will include a rover with a two-meter drill that will allow access deeper into the Martian soil than we have been able to get to before.

ExoMars 2016 in the Proton-M launcher at the launch pad in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

ExoMars 2016 in the Proton-M launcher at the launch pad in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.
Credit: ESA – B. Bethge

You can watch a livestream of the video from this page: Watch ExoMars Launch. Coverage begins at 08:30 GMT (04:30 am Eastern Daylight Time) on March 14, with launch scheduled at 09:31 GMT (05:30 am Eastern Daylight Time).

You can also get updates on the mission from the ESA_ExoMars Twitter feed:

Arrival at Mars is expected on October 19, 2016. For more information on the mission, check out ESA’s mission site.