A Fictive Flight Above Real Mars

You deserve a break. I recommend you take a few minutes to watch this jaw-dropping creation by Jan Fröjdman. Fröjdman retrieved thousands of stereoscopic images from the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. He assembled them into a video, and post-processed it into the masterpiece below. Enjoy.

(Make Full-Screen and HD for the most amazing results.)

Beagle 2 Found

On June 2nd, 2003, a Soyuz rocket with a Fregat upper stage blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, in Kazakhstan. The rocket carried the European Space Agency’s Mars Express mission instruments on an exciting journey to Mars. After spending less than a couple hours in a 200km (124 mile) parking orbit around Earth, the Fregat fired again, propelling the spacecraft towards a Mars transfer orbit. After three minutes, Mars Express separated from the Fregat and began its sixth month trek to the red planet.1

Artist's impression of Beagle 2 lander. -  ESA/Denman productions

Artist’s impression of Beagle 2 lander. –
ESA/Denman productions

Mars Express consisted of two main components: the Mars Express orbiter and the Beagle 2 lander. The two components were to separate, with the former continuing to orbit, map and study the planet and the latter to drop into the thin Martian atmosphere, land, and conduct research from the surface. On Christmas morning in 2003, Beagle 2 dropped onto Mars’s surface and was never heard from again. Many attempts were made to communicate with the lander, but no response was forthcoming. By February 2004, with no communications received from the Beagle, it was officially declared lost. The Mars Express orbiter, however, was a success and has been capturing important data and wonderful images of Mars for over a decade now.

Fast forward twelve years to the end of 2014. Michael Croon, a former member of the Mars Express team, and other colleagues continue to sift through images produced by the HiRISE camera that’s aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Croon had requested images of the planned landing area through HiWish, a public suggestion page for HiRISE targets. Against any likely odds, Croon spotted something on the edge of the frame in one of the images he acquired. The contrast was low in the initial image and he wasn’t convinced his candidate was anything special. He requested additional imagery from the same location. In the new images, his candidate was a bright spot that appeared to move slightly between images. This was suggestive of being consistent with sunlight reflecting off of various parts of the Beagle 2. Some careful image clean-up work conducted by the HiRISE team provided even clearer views of the object in question, all but confirming that the Beagle 2 was finally found.

December 15, 2014 image taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, showing what's believed to be the long-lost Beagle 2. -  NASA / JPL / Univ. of Arizona / Univ. of Leicester

December 15, 2014 image taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, showing what’s believed to be the long-lost Beagle 2. –
NASA / JPL / Univ. of Arizona / Univ. of Leicester

Subsequent discussion and analysis of the images suggests that the Beagle 2 only partially deployed its petal-like solar panels. The communications antenna would only have been revealed after a full deployment, thus the suspected reason why Beagle 2 never sent a message confirming it’s landing.

Labelled grey-scale image identifies the lander, and its parachute and rear cover.

Labelled grey-scale image identifies the lander, and its parachute and rear cover. –
University of Leicester/ Beagle 2/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

While it’s still a mystery as to the cause of the lander failing to deploy completely after landing, it is much relief to the team members that have spent the past 12 years wondering what had ever become of their precious lander.


  1. The Fregat coasted off into interplanetary space.

One More Thing About That Mars Object

The latest Curiosity status report indicates that the mysterious shiny object next to the rover “appears to be a shred of plastic material, likely benign, but it has not been definitively identified.”

To proceed cautiously, the team is continuing the investigation for another day before deciding whether to resume processing of the sample in the scoop. Plans include imaging of surroundings with the Mastcam.

A sample of sand and dust scooped up on Sol 61 remains in the scoop. Plans to transfer it from the scoop into other chambers of the sample-processing device were postponed as a precaution during planning for Sol 62 after the small, bright object was detected in an image from the Mast Camera (Mastcam).

I still attest that Curiosity should zap the thing with ChemCam.

(This might explain why I’m a blogger and not a NASA engineer.)


Curiosity Spots Something Curious

The Mars Curiosity rover tweeted (of course it tweets!) the following earlier this afternoon:

 

Today, Curiosity’s robotic arm reached down and scooped up its first sample of Martian dirt. Its cameras captured the historic moment, but caught something else too. There, among countless grains of reddish-orange sand, a single shimmering something caught the eyes of the image analysts back home on Earth.

Can you see it?
(Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

How about now?
(Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS and 46BLYZ)

Even clicking those images and looking at them full-size still doesn’t offer much more in the way of a better look. It’s definitely different than the soil and appears metallic, but that’s about all we can make out. NASA isn’t sure what it is yet either, which I think makes it more exciting. As a result they’ve temporarily halted anymore scooping:

Curiosity’s first scooping activity appeared to go well on Oct. 7. Subsequently, the rover team decided to refrain from using the rover’s robotic arm on Oct. 8 due to the detection of a bright object on the ground that might be a piece from the rover. Instead of arm activities during the 62nd Martian day, or sol, of the mission, Curiosity is acquiring additional imaging of the object to aid the team in identifying the object and assessing possible impact, if any, to sampling activities.

Curiosity even imaged the object with its ChemCam (Chemistry and Camera), but the raw image doesn’t offer much more than the MastCam1 images:

ChemCam view of unknown object
(Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL)

It looks a bit less metallic in this grayscale image, perhaps more like plastic. To me it looks like a discarded shell from someone’s shrimp cocktail. (But that’s just me!)

Hey, did you know that ChemCam also has a built-in laser? It totally does. The purpose of the instrument is to zap rocks with a laser while the camera images the resulting plasma created from the vaporized rock. It can then use the images to analyze the composition and other information about that rock.

It’s my firm belief that Curiosity should zap whatever this unknown object is.  For science!


  1. I’m not even going to look this one up… they call it that because it’s the camera on the mast

Waiting For Curiosity

Even though there’s still just under five months remaining until the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover lands on Mars’ surface, I almost find myself counting down the days. I woke up early to watch the launch of MSL live on NASA-TV last November and have followed the updates on its progress since then. One of the neat features you can find on the MSL website is the “Where Is Curiosity?” page, where simulated views of its progress from Earth to Mars are updated daily over its 36-week journey.

Watching the slight change in the images from day to day gave me an idea: these images could be made into a cool animation! So I hopped over to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology’s Solar System Simulator website, fiddled around with the various options, and then started collecting images for each day that the mission has been elapsed up until today. I put them together into a little video, added some music, and now I offer it to you for your interplanetary enjoyment.

In the top left, you can watch the days tick by. The MSL is labeled in green in the center of the video. If you’re interested in reading some of the details related to distance traveled and the speed of the craft, you’ll want to watch the video in HD and full-screen.

You’ll probably notice that around 14 seconds into the video (specifically, beginning with the frame for January 14), the perspective changes slightly. I’m not exactly sure what causes it, but its the way the simulator changed the images it spit out starting with that date. I’m going to contact the designer with JPL/Caltech and see if they can help me out with different perspectives. I hope to update it from time-to-time between now and August, to put Curiosity’s progress in perspective.


Majestic Conjunction

Have you seen the wondrous show that’s been taking place in the night sky recently? Maybe you noticed what appeared to be some especially bright stars, glittering near a crescent Moon. Perhaps you haven’t been looking up at the night sky lately (shame on you) or conditions have been too cloudy to give it a look (I live in a coastal city in Alaska, I feel your pain). Whether you’re looking or not, there’s a fantastic conjunction taking place, starring (pardon the pun!) the Moon, Jupiter, and Venus.

I took the following photo shortly after sunset on February 28, 2012, from within Joshua Tree National Park. Unfortunately, I didn’t have a lens to give me a wider field of view, but the top of a Yucca Plant provides a nice touch.
Moon, Jupiter, and Venus conjunction, labeled.

[Click image for larger and unlabeled version / Credit: Ryan Marquis/46BLYZ]

This cosmic spectacle will continue over the next few days, so get out and enjoy it while you can.

Also in the night sky this month:
While the Moon will have moved away from the planets, Venus and Jupiter will be within three degrees of each other on March 12. That’s approximately the same “width” as three fingertips held at arm’s length… The planets will appear quite close to one another!

Mars also refuses to be left out of this month’s planetary attention. Look for the red planet in the Eastern sky, just a few hours after the sun sets.

Clear skies!