Waiting For Curiosity

Even though there’s still just under five months remaining until the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover lands on Mars’ surface, I almost find myself counting down the days. I woke up early to watch the launch of MSL live on NASA-TV last November and have followed the updates on its progress since then. One of the neat features you can find on the MSL website is the “Where Is Curiosity?” page, where simulated views of its progress from Earth to Mars are updated daily over its 36-week journey.

Watching the slight change in the images from day to day gave me an idea: these images could be made into a cool animation! So I hopped over to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology’s Solar System Simulator website, fiddled around with the various options, and then started collecting images for each day that the mission has been elapsed up until today. I put them together into a little video, added some music, and now I offer it to you for your interplanetary enjoyment.

In the top left, you can watch the days tick by. The MSL is labeled in green in the center of the video. If you’re interested in reading some of the details related to distance traveled and the speed of the craft, you’ll want to watch the video in HD and full-screen.

You’ll probably notice that around 14 seconds into the video (specifically, beginning with the frame for January 14), the perspective changes slightly. I’m not exactly sure what causes it, but its the way the simulator changed the images it spit out starting with that date. I’m going to contact the designer with JPL/Caltech and see if they can help me out with different perspectives. I hope to update it from time-to-time between now and August, to put Curiosity’s progress in perspective.


[Vide-whoa!]The Known Universe

This is an amazing animation that I’ve gone back to watch at least a dozen times over the past couple of years.

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world’s most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History. (via American Museum of Natural History on YouTube)

I recommend going back and watching this video anytime you need a little bit of perspective in your life. It makes you feel pretty small, don’t ya think?