Mars Science Laboratory

Curosity on Mars - Artist's concept

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


As you most likely know, we’re just a day away from the planned launch of the Mars Science Laboratory. Curiosity is scheduled to launch on Nov. 26, 2011, at 10:02a.m. EST (7:02a.m. PST) for an eight-month, 570 million kilometer (354 million mile), trip to the red planet. Curiosity will launch from on top of an Atlas V rocket, one of the largest rockets currently available for interplanetary travel. The launch window exists from now until December 18, 2011, but as of today the current weather forecast shows a 70% chance for good weather come launch time.

NASA will be providing coverage of the launch both online and on NASA TV, with launch coverage beginning at 7:30am EST (4:30am PST).
Check out this video for an animated look at some of the mission milestones. (The animation is very cinematic and has what sounds like a Jason Bourne-themed score.)

Stay tuned to 46BLYZ.com for future coverage of the Mars Science Laboratory.

Total Lunar Eclipse

If you have clear skies, be sure to take the opportunity to view the total lunar eclipse of December 20/21, 2010. My forecast isn’t looking good, but I’m holding out hope that I’ll get a clear view and get some photographs of the event. The following image does a great job of detailing when to look, and what you can expect:
Total Lunar Eclipse of December 2010
*Note, the times listed on this image are for Alaskan time, which is 4 hours earlier than Eastern time.
I got the image from Mr. Eclipse who not only explains what you’re seeing, but provides a wealth of other information, including how to photograph it.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon enters the shadow of Earth. This can only happen during a full moon, but not every full moon coincides with an eclipse. Why? Because the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 5.1° to the Earth. So a lunar eclipse will occur when a full moon also happens to be on the same plane, or 0°, as the Earth.

If you’re plagued by cloudy skies, you can still watch it and participate in a live chat, courtesy of NASA/JPL.

So there you have it, no excuses. If you miss this one and reside in the North America, you won’t have another chance until 2014.

Happy observing!