Sunday Matinee – NASA at Saturn: Cassini’s Grand Finale

The final chapter in a remarkable mission of exploration and discovery, Cassini’s Grand Finale is in many ways like a brand new mission. Twenty-two times, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft will dive through the unexplored space between Saturn and its rings. What we learn from these ultra-close passes over the planet could be some of the most exciting revelations ever returned by the long-lived spacecraft. This animated video tells the story of Cassini’s final, daring assignment and looks back at what the mission has accomplished.


A Fictive Flight Above Real Mars

You deserve a break. I recommend you take a few minutes to watch this jaw-dropping creation by Jan Fröjdman. Fröjdman retrieved thousands of stereoscopic images from the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. He assembled them into a video, and post-processed it into the masterpiece below. Enjoy.

(Make Full-Screen and HD for the most amazing results.)

Sunday Matinee – Science In My Kitchen

While I recognize that this video is a departure from my primary focus on the space sciences, I just had to share this video. My kids and I made this video as we explored the interactions between milk and dish soap, using food coloring to make the interaction visible.

Kind of neat, yeah? The video should show you everything you need to know to try it yourself. The degreasing elements of the dish soap break up the fat in the milk (whole milk will work better than reduced fat), and the food coloring is along for the ride.

I bet you have everything you need to try this yourself, so what are you waiting for?


Neil deGrasse Tyson on The Daily Show

Astrophysicist, and renowned promoter of science, Neil deGrasse Tyson, sat down for an interview on The Daily Show with John Stewart. As always, Neil’s commentary drips of a passion for discovery and exploration. Science and comedy mix well!

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart


Ascent – Commemorating The Shuttle Program

This video is making its rounds on the internet. It serves as a beautiful tribute to NASA’s shuttle program. The video is 45-minutes long, but you don’t have to watch it in one sitting; in fact, you can skip around a bit and just enjoy the amazing high-definition, slow-motion, videos of the shuttle systems.

It’s going to be very difficult to say goodbye to the shuttle program, early next year.